Category Archives: sailing

Lamb-a-rama 2015

We thought we would have another lamb roast on this glorious Thanksgiving weekend at Aquatic Park Sailing club. We dug a pit and lit a fire.  Cooking was supervised buy The Man-who-knows-meat, Dalibor .

The girls “helped” and kept Levi the spit boy company. Sophie likes to grab the camera and take photos, here’s her perspective on the event.

 

Up the Rideau

In front of the Newboro locks.

This summer we took Tortuga up the Rideau canal to Ottawa, it was a great trip. I hope write some tips from the trip for others – in the mean time here are some photos from the Toronto -Coburg-Kingston leg.
Continue reading Up the Rideau

Lake Garda – summer 2009

Today it is -15 ° outside and tonight I stumbled upon some photos from our honeymoon, these photos really warmed me up.
Lake Garda is in northern Italy, it runs north/south with steep mountain sides, creating a natural wind funnel. We stayed at the town on the southern end of the lake and found ourselves in the midst of a dingy competition – boy I wanted to hop in a boat and take off.

New boat!

We did it! We have stepped up to a 1999 Hunter 340. It’s a big leap but ouR rationale is a bigger boat will be a cottage substitute and allow us to do over-nighters in style with a real kitchen, bathroom (shower!) and bedroom! The cockpit is clear of ropes as the arch has the traveler on it and all lines run under the deck and a swim platform (with shower!). It has a roller-furler on the jib and main, for super ease of use.  I think if it as a floating rec-room, hopefully the kids will too.

Of course we need a new name… Sophie suggested “Dude” in honour of the turtle in Finding Nemo.

Bigger better faster – more expensive

I’m contemplating a bigger boat, while the Tanzer 7.5 is a perfect day sailor for us, with two little ones it is a bit difficult to contemplate longer trips. Given that we live so close to the boat we have never slept overnight on the boat, but the desire is there. With a larger boat I can envision spending time (days/weeks) on the boat – a proper head, kitchen with refrigeration, stove and cupboards, sleeping quarters and a kid friendly cockpit & swim platform go along way to selling the idea. Trips to the 1000 islands or Kingston, NYC or up the Trent Severn lock system seem much more palatable on a larger boat.

IMG_0390
I own this boat now!

I am a bit stunned by how quickly the price shoots up on larger boats, so I have been researching fractional ownership. There seem to be a few companies in Toronto offering fractional ownership of new boats, but that seems a bit out of my league (price wise) and you don’t get a lot of sailing time. I know there are people out there sharing ownership so this looks like a good route – I am thinking more along the lines of a hybrid of bareboat chartering and shared ownership. In the course of my research I came upon a new website called nautical monkey . They are a Canadian company with a minimal membership expense. I am interested to see if it gets populated with people in the Toronto area.

Let me know you experience or thoughts on fractional ownership!

Fall sail

We ended the 2012 season with a circumnavigation of the Toronto Islands. It was a beautiful September day, perfect for a stop at Center Island for a picnic.

Marlinspike

Marlinspike
Marlinspike

The term Marlinspike was new to me a week ago when I encountered it in my Canadian Power Sail Squadron’s Seamanship course materials. I assumed it was some esoteric school or methodology, but Marlinspike refers to both the tool and the techniques of working with ropes for nautical purposes such as knots, bends, hitches and splices. (The fish marlin is named after the marlinspike!)

Below is pictured my first attempt at an eye splice on some Home Depot nylon rope. It was pretty easy when I followed the instructions provided on animatedknots.com, the diagram in my Seamanship course pack was pretty hard to follow, I highly recommend the animatedknots website, as the name suggests, there are very clear animated videos and it allows you to scrub/step through the knot tying slowly and clearly.

Below is pictured my first attempt at an eye splice on some Home Depot nylon rope. It was pretty easy when I followed the instructions provided on animatedknots.com, the diagram in my Seamanship course pack was pretty hard to follow, I highly recommend the animatedknots website, as the name suggests, there are very clear animated videos and it allows you to scrub/step through the knot tying slowly and clearly.

eye splice in white nylon rope
eye splice
Next time my Tanzer 7.5 needs new mooring pennants, I’ll make them myself!